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Installation:  Hanging drywall costs rely on a variety of existing conditions.  First we calculate the total area and room size, drywall type, thickness and dimensions. The price can go from $1.50 per sq foot with a liberal give or take.
Typical costs: Patch kits to repair small holes in existing drywall are $2 -$20; the more expensive kits contain materials to patch several holes or up to four feet of cracks. Simple repairs can also be made using joint compound ($3 -$15), a drywall hand saw ($5 -$16) and average household tools such as a hammer, drill and utility knife. Better Homes & Gardens gives directions for patching small holes up a few inches wide and larger holes up to eight inches across. Drywall materials (drywall sheets plus screws or nails, joint compound, tape, etc.) average 25 cents - 65 cents a square foot; professional installation is an additional 85 cents -$1.50 per square foot. Installing new drywall on the walls and ceiling of a 12x12-foot-room with 8-foot-high walls means about 530 square feet of drywall.


Here's some info for the do-it-yourself project:
Repairing holes, structural cracks, stains, and water damage to wallboard is easy. Plaster repairs are a little more complex but can be accomplished. You should check the overall condition of the walls and ceilings before making any repairs. If they feel spongy, or have large bulges and cracks, hire a professional to cover or replace the entire surface. Most hardware stores have several products for removing stains from painted walls. Test new products in an inconspicuous area before using them. Apply the remover to a clean, dry cloth and rub it lightly across the stain. If you can't completely remove a stain, seal the area and repaint it. White pigmented shellac will keep stains from bleeding through a new coat of paint. Apply the pigmented shellac, and let it dry thoroughly. Then repaint the area, feathering the new paint onto the surrounding surface. To permanently patch peeling paint, start by scraping away all the loose paint, using a putty knife or paint scraper. Apply spackle to the edges of the chipped paint, using a putty knife or flexible wallboard knife. Let the patch dry completely, then sand the area with 150-grit sandpaper. When the patch is smooth and you can't feel any ridges along the edges, paint the patch, feathering the edges.
Before you begin patching a large hole, make sure the lath backing is solid. To create a smooth, firm edge the patch can adhere to, sand or scrape any texture or loose paint from the area around the hole. Use a wallboard knife to test the plaster around the edges of the damaged area. Scrape away all loose or soft plaster. Liberally apply a latex bonding liquid around the edges of the hole and over the base lath. Plaster walls are constructed in layers. Behind the plaster is a layer of wood, metal, or rock lath the holds the plaster in place. To properly fill small dents and holes in plaster, you have to establish a solid base for the patch. Scrape or sand away any loose plaster or peeling paint. Fill the hole with lightweight spackle. Apply the spackle with the smallest knife that will span the damage. Let the spackle dry. Sand the patch lightly with 150-grit production sandpaper. Wipe the dust away with a clean cloth, then prime and paint the area, feathering the paint to blend the edges. Prepare Area to Patch - The plaster walls and ceilings in many older homes can be a mixed blessing. Although a plaster surface is durable, it is subject to cracking and can come loose from the lath and/or the framing. In some cases you can reattach the plaster and blend the repaired area into the original surface. The step-by-step process saves you the time and expense of replacing the entire wall or ceiling. Before you paint a room, you should check thoroughly for nail pops. Fixing them is an easy task, and it will improve the appearance of the walls. Inserting a wall patch is a basic skill you should master. Holes most often are the result of accidental damage, although you sometimes need to cut holes during remodeling projects to pull new wiring or to install other utilities. Mix the patching plaster

Mix the patching plaster as directed by the manufacturer, and use a wallboard knife to apply it to the hole. Shallow holes can be filled with a single coat, but be careful not to fill too much at a time-thick layers tend to crack, despite the effects of the bonding liquid. For deeper holes, apply a shallow first coat, then scratch a crosshatch pattern in the wet plaster. Let this coat dry, then apply a second coat of plaster. Let the second coat dry, then lightly sand the patched area. Use texture paint or wallboard compound to re-create any surface texture. Depending on the texture you're trying to duplicate, you can use a roller, whisk broom, trowel, sponge, or paintbrush. Practice on heavy cardboard until you can duplicate the wall's surface. Prime and paint the area: ring-shank nails, dead-man supports, drive fasteners, fastening processes, adhesive, sheet of drywall, G threads, W threads, S threads,
gypsum-to-gypsum, lath, steel studs, plaster surface, resilient channels, framing, textured ceiling, plaster walls and ceilings, reattach the plaster. Also called wallboard, plasterboard or sheetrock, drywall is simply factory-made sheets of paper-wrapped gypsum plaster installed to create a flat, firm wall or ceiling as a foundation for paint or wallpaper. Typical costs: Patch kits to repair small holes in existing drywall are $2 -$20; the more expensive kits contain materials to patch several holes or up to four feet of cracks. Simple repairs can also be made using joint compound ($3 -$15), a drywall hand saw ($5 -$16) and average household tools such as a hammer, drill and utility knife. Better Homes & Gardens gives directions for patching small holes up a few inches wide and larger holes up to eight inches across. Drywall materials (drywall sheets plus screws or nails, joint compound, tape, etc.) average 25 cents - 65 cents a square foot; professional installation is an additional 85 cents -$1.50 per square foot. Installing new drywall on the walls and ceiling of a 12x12-foot-room with 8-foot-high walls means about 530 square feet of drywall. For about 4,000 square feet of drywall on all the walls and ceilings of a small home, it's $4,400 -$8,600 or more. Factors such as cathedral ceilings or irregular layouts can bump the price higher. And it's easier to install drywall in a house that's under construction, so remodeling projects tend to be at the higher end of the price range. Do-It-Yourselfers can bring the costs down to $150 -$250 for a 12x12 room and $1,000 -$3,000 for a small house, but hanging drywall requires a lot of heavy lifting by at least two people, and getting a good finish on drywall requires a lot of patience and practice. Philadelphia, PA, Middletown, Lower Merion, Marple, Thornbury. Drill pilot holes every 12" along the vertical moldings.
To attach the moldings, first drive 4d finish nails near the inside edge of the moldings and into the jambs. Then, drive 6d finish nails near the outside edge of the molding and into the framing members. Measure along the setback lines between the installed moldings and cut the top and bottom moldings, mitering the ends at 45 degrees. Drill pilot holes and attach the moldings with 4d and 6d finish nails, as described above. Lock-nail the corner joints by drilling a pilot hole and driving a 4d finish nail through each corner. Set all nail heads below the surface of the molding, using a nail set. Fill the holes with wood putty. Then, stain or prime and paint the molding. Replace Sagging Ceilings
         Sagging is a common problem with old wallboard ceilings. Water is a common cause of sagging. If you have a water problem, be sure to fix the leak before repairing the ceiling. The solution for most sagging problems is to prop up the sagging panels, using a
T-brace, and fasten the wallboard to the ceiling joists with screws.  If the wallboard edges have been damaged, use broad, thin washers to provide support for the weakened material. Raising sagging panels might cause the existing fasteners to pop through the wallboard surface. If this happens, either pull the fasteners out or drive them back in. To make a T-brace, cut a 2 x 4 board " longer than the height of the ceiling. Cut another 2 x 4 to 4 ft. and attach it to the end of the longer one so the two are perpendicular. Set a piece of plywood or hardboard on the floor to use as a skid for the brace and to protect the floor surface. Position the brace under the lowest point of the sagging area. Set the bottom end on the skid and nudge it forward until the sagging panels are tight to the joists. Screws hold best if they depress the paper slightly without breaking through. Ideally, the screw head should be set 1/16" below the surface. If your drill has a variable clutch setting, try a few test screws and adjust the clutch so it engages when the screw is at the right length. Remove any loose tape from the joint between wallboard panels.

 Drive the screws with washers through the center of the joint and into the ceiling joists. Start at the end of the damaged area and work in one direction along the joint, driving a screw every 4" or at every joist. To fasten sagging areas that aren't along a joint, align the screws with the existing fasteners to be sure you'll hit a joist. Drive a screw 2 inches from each existing fastener. When the area is securely fastened, remove the T-brace. Repeat the process to fix other sagging areas. Scrape off any loose chips of paint or wallboard around the joint and screws, using a wallboard knife. Fill the joint and depressions made by the fasteners with wallboard compound. Cover large cracks or gaps with fiberglass wallboard tape before applying the compound. If needed, texture the area to match. Setback line 1/8" from the inside edge of each jamb.

You'll install the moldings flush with these lines. Place a length of molding against one side jamb, flush with the setback line. If you have a double-hung window, hold the molding flush with the edge of the jamb. At the top and bottom of window moldings, mark the points where the horizontal and vertical setback lines meet. On doors, mark the moldings at the top only. Cut the ends of the molding at a 45 degree angle, using a power miter saw. Measure and cut the other vertical molding piece, using the same method.
Carefully pry off the baseboard and top moldings. Use a wallboard or putty knife to create a gap, then insert a pry bar and pull the trim away from the wall. Remove all the nails. Draw a line from the top of the panel to the bottom, 3" or 4" from each edge of the panel. Holding a framing square along this line, cut along it with a linoleum knife. If you use a fair amount of pressure, you should be able to cut the panel with one or two passes. If you have trouble cutting all the way through the panel, use a hammer and chisel to break it along the scored lines. Insert a pry bar under the panel, beginning at the bottom. Pry the panel up and away from the wall, removing nails as you go. Once this center piece of the panel is out of the way, pry off the narrow pieces that remain along the edges. When all of the panel has been removed, scrape away the old adhesive, using a putty knife or chisel. Make any needed cutouts, and test-fit the new panel, making sure the directional arrows on the back are positioned correctly. Run zig-zag beads of panel adhesive from the top to the bottom of the panel, placing one bead every 16", about 2" in from each edge, and around every cutout. Tack the panel into position at the top, using color-matched paneling nails. Following the adhesive manufacturer's directions, use shims to prop the panel away from the wall long enough for the adhesive to set up properly. When the adhesive has set up, press the panel to the wall and lightly tap along stud lines with a rubber mallet, creating a tight bond between the adhesive and the wall. Drive finish nails at the base of the panel to hold it in position while the adhesive dries. To protect the finish of the panel, drive the nails to within 1/8" of the face, then use a nail set to countersink the nails. Replace the baseboard and trim moldings, and fill all the nail holes. Replace a Window or Door Molding
         If you need to replace a window or door molding, first pry off the old moldings. When you feel a few nails pop, move farther along the molding and pry again. If you're working on a window or exterior door, check the insulation around the frame, and fill any gaps with expandable foam or strips of fiberglass insulation. On double-hung windows, moldings are usually installed flush with the edge of the jamb. Replace Paneling If paneling has suffered major damage, the only way to repair it is to replace the affected sheets. You have to first turn off the electricity to the area and remove all receptacle covers and switch plates on the sheets of paneling that need to be replaced.
 
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